Dating a rape victim help

Ex-Stanford swimmer Brock Turner was sentenced to 6 months in jail for sexually assaulting a woman but was released from jail Sept. The case came to a close Thursday when the judge sentenced Turner to six months in county jail and then probation, and ordered him to register as a sex offender over three sexual assault convictions: assault with the intent to commit rape, sexual penetration with a foreign object of an intoxicated person and sexual penetration with a foreign object of an unconscious person, according to Palo Alto Online. Prosecutors said that in January 2015, witnesses saw Turner sexually assaulting an unconscious woman behind a dumpster on campus.Then the victim stood in the packed courtroom in Palo Alto and delivered what Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeff Rosen called “the most eloquent, powerful and compelling piece of victim advocacy that I’ve seen in my 20 years as a prosecutor,” according to Palo Alto Online. We can let this destroy us, I can remain angry and hurt and you can be in denial, or we can face it head on, I accept the pain, you accept the punishment, and we move on.” [A fellow father responds to Stanford sex offender’s dad: ‘His victim is the victim’] The 12-page letter, which was published by Palo Alto Online and Buzz Feed News, has been released by Santa Clara County.“You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice, until today,” she read in court from her victim impact statement, according to the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office. Here is the victim’s impact statement in full: Your honor, If it is all right, for the majority of this statement I would like to address the defendant directly.I had multiple swabs inserted into my vagina and anus, needles for shots, pills, had a nikon pointed right into my spread legs.I had long, pointed beaks inside me and had my vagina smeared with cold, blue paint to check for abrasions. I stood there examining my body beneath the stream of water and decided, I don’t want my body anymore.You don’t know me, but you’ve been inside me, and that’s why we’re here today.On January 17th, 2015, it was a quiet Saturday night at home.

To calm me down, they said it’s just the flora and fauna, flora and fauna.

I thought maybe I had fallen and was in an admin office on campus. I still remember the feeling of my hands touching my skin and grabbing nothing. The thin piece of fabric, the only thing between my vagina and anything else, was missing and everything inside me was silenced. In order to keep breathing, I thought maybe the policemen used scissors to cut them off for evidence.

Then, I felt pine needles scratching the back of my neck and started pulling them out my hair. I shuffled from room to room with a blanket wrapped around me, pine needles trailing behind me, I left a little pile in every room I sat in.

Most states permit them at parole hearings, and victim impact information is generally included in the pre-sentencing report presented to the judge. Copyright 2008 by the National Center for Victims of Crime.

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