Optically stimulated luminescence dating method

Recent research at Olduvai has focused primarily on earlier beds, so research on these later beds will likely present new data to consider.Four key previously excavated sites will be investigated through full-scale excavation.Professor Julia Lee-Thorp from Oxford University with researchers from Chad, France and the US analysed the carbon isotope ratios in the teeth and found the signature of a diet rich in foods derived from C4 plants.Professor Lee-Thorp, a specialist in isotopic analyses of fossil tooth enamel, from the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, said: "We found evidence suggesting that early hominins, in central Africa at least, ate a diet mainly composed of tropical grasses and sedges.

This stone tool is most often associated with Homo erectus, a hominin considered by many scientists to be a possible human (Homo) ancestor.

They tested their hypothesis by conducting ultrasound imaging of the fibers of the large calf muscles of individuals in all four groups.

The results showed that the Agta and Twa tree-climbers had significantly longer muscle fibers than those of their agricultural counterparts and other "industrialized" modern humans.

Homo erectus is widely thought to be the first species to venture out of Africa to populate the Middle East/Eurasia.

British Museum, Discott, Wikimedia Commons (Tanzania) 22 December 2012 An international team of researchers have returned to Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania to unravel the mystery of how humans transitioned from the first stone tool technology to a more sophisticated industry.

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